Aunties Joy & Young Ja
Aunties Joy & Young Ja
Joy and her mom, Young Ja, have been part of the Auntie Sewing Squad since all the way back in April! Prior to the pandemic shutting down the various realms of performing arts around the country, Joy enjoyed life as part of the behind-the-scenes crew of reality TV. Currently, she works remotely.

Young Ja lives with her daughter due to needing some assistance with daily care as an immunocompromised elder. She helps with mask making while spending quality time with Joy.

Here’s what Joy has to say about her life as an Auntie,
“As a Story Producer in reality TV, I’ve been lucky enough to work remotely in post-production. But with the shutdown also came the responsibility of caring for my 81-year-old, immunocompromised mom, Young Ja. Aging is an unkind process and I’m seeing first-hand how the isolation and inactivity of the past months have sped up that decline. Still, I’m grateful that the shutdown has allowed me to spend more time with her, hearing her stories of being in first grade when Korea was liberated from Japanese colonization 75 years ago, reading poetry by a fellow Auntie’s father, and making kimchi along with the Auntie Sewing Squad’s live Zoom tutorial. ASS has been a wonderful community, giving me the opportunity to be productive in the hours between work and elder-care, and providing positivity and support that buoys me in those moments I’d otherwise have been overwhelmed by the latest horrors on the news. I have sewn masks for family and friends, for patients with Huntington’s Disease, I organized a campaign for the Center for the Pacific Asian Family, which shelters non-English speaking abused women and children in LA, as well as contributed to the bigger ASS campaigns for Navajo and other First Nations, Planned Parenthood, and farmworkers. I’m grateful for Kristina Wong’s chutzpah in creating and managing this movement, and all the Aunties who pour their time and love into it. The Auntie Sewing Squad allows me to do what I can, when I can, with what I have; and without that bright spot of hope and care that our work creates, these days would feel very dark indeed.”